Tag Archives: Baseball

Play Ball?

Play Ball?

Sam Schneider | May 27th, 2020

In a move that surprised absolutely no one, Major League Baseball owners proposed a return-to-play plan that the players effectively scoffed at, putting fans’ hopes for a baseball return in question. Continue reading

Advertisements
KBO Power Rankings: Chang-mo Koo

KBO Week Three Power Rankings

Alex Kielar | May 26th, 2020

This KBO season seems to be flying by as we hit the three-week mark for these rankings. We are getting closer to hopefully having an MLB season, but in the meantime let’s continue to fill the baseball void.

Continue reading

MLB The Show Rebuild: Pittsburgh Pirates

MLB The Show Rebuild: Pittsburgh Pirates

Daniel Corrigan | May 24th, 2020

Hello, welcome to the first installment of what will most definitely be the most time-consuming series I have ever done. I will be rebuilding baseball teams through MLB The Show 20’s franchise simulation.

Continue reading

Florida/Miami Marlins Mount Rushmore: Jose Fernandez

Florida/Miami Marlins Mount Rushmore

John Lepore | May 22nd, 2020

The Florida/ Miami Marlins came into the league in 1993. Despite the short history, the Marlins have two World Series Championships (1997, 2003). They’ve also had some pretty good players come through their franchise. But who makes the Florida/Miami Marlins Mount Rushmore?

Continue reading

Murph and The Maj Podcast: Baseball Edition

Murph and The Maj Podcast: Baseball Edition

The Scorecrow | May 20th, 2020

Will there be a Major League Baseball season? If so, what will it look like? How are the New York Mets and New York Yankees looking? For these questions and more, Johnnie Black joins @1murphblue and @TheMaj_NFL on the podcast to talk some baseball.

Continue reading

Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers Mount Rushmore Vin Scully

Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers Mount Rushmore

Alex Kielar | May 15th, 2020

The Dodgers have had a very storied history, they were founded in 1883 as the Brooklyn Atlantics. They moved to the National League in 1890. The Dodgers played in Brooklyn until 1957 when they moved to Los Angeles. They won an American Association Pennant in 1889, 23 National League Pennants, and won six World Series titles, one while in Brooklyn and five while in Los Angeles. With all this history, they have had a lot of legendary players, so it will be hard to limit their Mount Rushmore to just four. Nevertheless, here we go. Continue reading

Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos Mount Rushmore: Tim Raines

Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos Mount Rushmore

John Lepore | May 13th, 2020

A franchise that has only been around since 1969 has a limited amount of players to choose from. Especially a franchise that hasn’t had much success until recently. Nevertheless, we will choose the four players to have their faces immortalized on the Washington Nationals/Montreal Expos Mount Rushmore.

Continue reading

KBO week 1 Power Rankings Dae-Ho Lee

KBO Week 1 Power Rankings

Alex Kielar  | May 11th, 2020

We are now one week into the KBO season and after watching a few of the first few games and doing some research, I am here to give you my first power rankings of the season. Every Monday is the universal off day for all KBO teams, so that is when I will have my weekly power rankings. It’s clearly a small sample size so far and I don’t know much about the KBO yet, but I will do my best to rank them fairly. With all that out of the way, let’s get to the power rankings. Continue reading

Atlanta Braves Mount Rushmore: Hank Aaron

Atlanta Braves Mount Rushmore

Alex Kielar | May 8th, 2020

If there is a Major League Baseball season this year, it will be the 149th for the Boston/Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves. Starting out as the Boston Red Stockings in the early 1870s, they are one of the most historic teams in history and are actually the only one of the current 30 teams to field a team every season professional baseball has been in existence. With a team that has been around for so long, it is difficult to limit this to just four players. Nevertheless, here are the players who should be on a hypothetical Atlanta Braves Mount Rushmore. Continue reading

Milwaukee Brewers Mount Rushmore: Robin Yount and Paul Molitor

Milwaukee Brewers Mount Rushmore

John Lepore | May 6th, 2020

The Milwaukee Brewers have a shorter history in Major League Baseball than many teams. They started as the Seattle Pilots in 1969 and moved to Milwaukee after the sale of the team to Bud Selig. They made their only World Series appearance in 1982 so you’d expect a couple of those guys to be on this monument. Who fills out the rest of the Milwaukee Brewers Mount Rushmore?

Continue reading

Former Closer Jim Johnson

The Downfall Of Jim Johnson: What Really Happened?

Adrian Andrew | May 6th, 2020

There have only been three MLB relievers to have multiple 50 save seasons. Can you guess those three? Eric Gagne, Mariano Rivera, and Jim Johnson. Wait, what? Jim Johnson? Okay okay, maybe that wasn’t mind-boggling enough for you. Only two closers have ever recorded back to back 50 save seasons. The two men to accomplish that feat would be none other than Eric Gagne and… Jim Johnson.

Continue reading

COVID-19 baseball

Who’s On First? Covid-19 Edition

Sam Schneider | May 5th, 2020

“Wel- uh um ttoo Ope ing-ing Day-ay ah twennnnnty-tee bayayseball eason!”.

More iconic words have probably never been spoken in the history of Major League Baseball. Even with less-than-stellar Wi-Fi, the announcer (sitting on his deck near the coast of South Carolina) is ushering in the first game of a season. It was delayed by a world pandemic and still with many restrictions in place. He is watching the same feed as you and me. Coming to us from a solitary camera perched in the stands. It is roughly seventy-five feet behind home plate and elevated for a full view of the field.

Continue reading

Baltimore Orioles Malachi Emond

Interview With Baltimore Orioles Prospect Malachi Emond

Adrian Andrew | May 5th, 2020

Recently I had the privilege to interview Orioles prospect, Malachi Emond. Emond was drafted in the 18th round of the MLB Draft in 2019, and in his minor league debut season with the Aberdeen IronBirds (Short-season Class A) Emond posted a solid 2.66 ERA, over 20.1 innings pitched, with one save. It seems that the Orioles organization is grooming him as a closer or possibly a set-up man. Continue reading

Korean Baseball DFS: Byung Ho Park

Korean Baseball DFS

Brandon Braasch | May 4th, 2020

Covid-19 has forced the DFS sites and community to get creative with there contests. There have not been live sports in over a month and people are losing their minds. DFS sites have even gone as far as having contests for reality TV shows. That makes the KBO contest even less crazy.

Continue reading

Los Angeles Angels Mount Rushmore: Mike Trout

Los Angeles Angels Mount Rushmore

John Lepore | May 4th, 2020

If we have a Major League Baseball season this year, it will be the 60th for the California/Los Angeles Angels. For teams like the Angels that have a shorter history than most, it is hard to pick four players. Nevertheless, let’s see who would be on the Los Angeles Angels Mount Rushmore.

Continue reading

Oakland Athletics Mount Rushmore: Rickey Henderson

Oakland Athletics Mount Rushmore

Joel Dorcas | May 3rd, 2020

The Oakland Athletics have been an active franchise in Major League Baseball since 1901. They were first located in Philadelphia then moved briefly to Kansas City before settling to where they are now in 1968. The Athletics play their home games at extremely spacious Oakland Coliseum. Although not as impactful and historic as the Boston’s and New York’s of the world, this franchise has had some great and charismatic players dawn the green and gold. Let’s open up the history books and reveal the Oakland Athletics Mount Rushmore. Continue reading

St. Louis Cardinals Mount Rushmore: Stan Musial

St. Louis Cardinals Mount Rushmore

Caitlin Roche | May 3rd, 2020

In the hypothetical erection of The St. Louis Cardinals Mount Rushmore (which in my head are just giant busts super glued to the peak of the arch), four players have cemented their names at the top of record books and on the hearts of nearly every St. Louis Cardinals fan.

Continue reading

Houston Astros Mount Rushmore: Biggio and Bagwell

Houston Astros Mount Rushmore

Euan Leith | May 1st, 2020

The Houston Astros have been around since 1962, but only have three pennants and one World Series championship to their name. Despite the lack of team accolades, the franchise has had a ton of talent grace the fields of the Astrodome and Minute Maid Park.

Continue reading

The new Boston Red Sox Ace, Eduardo Rodriguez

Eduardo Rodriguez Preparing For Bigger Role In 2020

Jamie Gatlin | April 27th, 2020

When the MLB season does begin, the Boston Red Sox will have a new opening day starter for the first time since 2017. Over the past two years, that honor has fallen to Chris Sale, however, he will miss all of the 2020 season due to Tommy John surgery. Due to Sale’s absence, Eduardo Rodriguez will most likely be named the opening day starter. The former top prospect is coming off a career year and will now have even higher expectations. Continue reading

What Is The Future Of Minor League Baseball Post-Coronavirus?

.John Supowitz | April 24th, 2020  

Thanks to the current pandemic, we are stuck at home binge-watching The Office and having night terrors of Joe Exotic. The one major thing we don’t have is sports. Rest assured, sports will come back, but at what capacity? Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 21: First At-Bat Salami, Perfecto, and Moving Cities

Alex Kielar | April 21st, 2020

Joey Ricotta joins me to discuss this day in baseball history. On April 21. Philip Humber pitched the 21st perfect game in major league history, Bill Duggleby hit a grand slam in his first at-bat in 1898 (not done again until 2005), a couple of teams moved cities, and one team made their debut.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 20: Boston Strong, Ashburn, Teddy Ballgame and Roberto Clemente

Alex Kielar | April 20th, 2020

I am once again solo to look back on this day in baseball history! I look back at the first game at Fenway Park since the Boston bombing (Boston Strong!), Richie Ashburn and Ted Williams making their major league debuts, and Roberto Clemente posthumously being inducted into the Hall of Fame.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 19: Pomp and Circumstance, Iron Man, and the Dark Night

Alex Kielar | April 19th, 2020

I am back for another solo episode as I look back on this day in baseball history. I talked about Sparky Lyle becoming the first pitcher to have an entrance song (coming out to Pomp and Circumstance), Cal Ripken, Jr. being placed on the disabled list for the first time in his career, and Matt Harvey setting a modern-day record.

Continue reading

Josh Taylor Enters 2020 with High Expectations

Jamie Gatlin | April 19th, 2020

For the Boston Red Sox, the 2019 season was one to forget. After winning it all in 2018, the Red Sox finished third in the AL East and missed the playoffs for the first time in three years. The defending champs were besieged by injuries and a bullpen that struggled for the majority of the season. Although the Red Sox pitching struggled, some young players such as Josh Taylor stepped up. While the start of the 2020 season has been delayed, they’re optimistic that the season will be played. Taylor will be an important piece for Boston.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 18: Slammin’ Sammy, Schmitty, and House That Ruth Built

Alex Kielar | April 18th, 2020

I am back with Joey Ricotta for another episode looking back on baseball history! We alk about Sammy Sosa becoming the all-time Cubs home run leader, Mike Schmidt hitting his 500th career home run, Yankee Stadium opening up, and more!

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 17: KB, Uba, Thurman

Alex Kielar | April 17th, 2020

I am back for another episode as I bring on  Joey Ricotta to look back on the biggest things that happened on this day in baseball history! We talked about Kris Bryant making his major league debut, Ubaldo Jimenez pitching the Rockies first no-hitter, Thurman Munson being named captain of the Yankees and more!

Continue reading

What If… The 1994 MLB Strike Never Happened (World Series and Beyond)

John Lepore | April 15th, 2020

The 1994 MLB strike devastated baseball. It was the first time since 1904 that the World Series wasn’t played. It cut short historic seasons, deprived franchises of turning their fortunes around, and cost the game some fans who had grown up on the crack of the bat and the smell of peanuts. But on August 11, 1994, after Randy Johnson struck out Ernie Young, there was no joy in Mudville or any other town where baseball was played.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 13: The Godfather Part II, Switch-Chipper, and The Hit King

Alex Kielar | April 13th, 2020

I am joined by me, myself, and I again to look back on this day in baseball history. I talk about Barry Bonds passing his Godfather on the all-time home run list to be by himself in third place, Chipper Jones joining some legendary switch-hitting company, and Pete Rose getting a couple big hit milestones 21 years apart.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar: This Day in Baseball History – April 12: Captain Lou, The Godfather, and New Parks

Alex Kielar | April 12th, 2020

Joey Ricotta joins me again as we talk about Barry Bonds joining his Godfather Willie Mays for third on the all-time home run list. Lou Gehrig becomes Captain, Candlestick Park opens up, and much more.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 11: Debut of Yaz, Shin Guards, Mets, and Angels

Alex Kielar | April 11th, 2020 

To look back on this day in baseball history, I brought on Joey Ricotta this time to talk about a few debuts including Carl Yastrzemski‘s Major League debut and the debut of shin guards being used by a catcher. Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 10: Colt .45s and More Cowbell, Buehrle That’s All We Need

Alex Kielar  | April 10th, 2020

I am joined again by Johnnie Black to look back in today in baseball history. On this day, Ken Griffey Jr. hit two milestone home runs on his father Ken Griffey Sr.’s birthday, the color barrier was broken as Jackie Robinson was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers, and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays had “More Cowbell”.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 8: Hank Does It, Futility, and the Old Man and the Shea

Alex Kielar  | April 8th, 2020 Another episode of Today in Baseball History. I’m joined again by Johnnie Black and we talk about Hank Aaron‘s historic feat, the ultimate 0-fer, and when a pitcher wins at a stadium that’s younger than he is. Continue reading

Philadelphia Phillies 2020 Season Preview

John Lepore | April 8th, 2020

The Philadelphia Phillies finished exactly .500 last season. With J.T. Realmuto and Bryce Harper heading into 2019, the Phillies had high hopes for a playoff berth. While both players performed well (top 2 on the team in bWAR), the Phillies squad had other problems.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 7: Chronicles of Baseball: The Tiger, the Prince, and the Closer

Alex Kielar  | April 7th, 2020 

I am back again for another solo episode as I look back on today in baseball history including Jack Morris throwing a no-hitter, Prince Fielder matching his father Cecil’s career home run mark, and the closer role becoming official with the very first save in history by Bill Singer.

Continue reading

MLB’s Best Pitching Rotations of the Past Decade (Part One)

Joel Dorcas | April 7th, 2020

This quarantine has turned into compiling lists of best and worst for me as we have no present-day gameplay to write about. My focus has been on the NHL lately, let’s change gears and take a crack at baseball. One of my favorite things about the sport is the construction of rotations and batting orders/ lineups. First up will be Starting Rotations. (Feel free to comment with your favorites/ ones that should be on the list).We will break it up into two parts. Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 6: DH, Cycles, and Records

Alex Kielar  | April 6th, 2020 

I am back again solo to bring you everything that happened today in baseball history, as there were several records tied and broken, including Trevor Story being the first player to hit a homer in each of his first three major league games and Jack Morris making his 14th straight Opening Day start. Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar: This Day In Baseball History – April 4: Tuffy, Tommy, and Hammerin’ Hank

Alex Kielar  | April 4th, 2020  I’m joined again by Johnnie Black for today’s baseball history. We talk about Tuffy Rhodes‘s three-HR game and Hank Aaron tying the mighty Babe. Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – April 2: Records Broken, Ichiro MLB Debut, Trades

Alex Kielar | April 2nd, 2020

Today in baseball history, Johnnie Black and I looked back on some records that were broken, including David Ortiz breaking the RBI record for a designated hitter, Ichiro making his debut in 2001, and a few trades that went down. We also had some discussion on the Hall of Fame, including whether Ichiro could be the second unanimous Hall of Famer in history.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – March 31: Trades and Expansion Teams

Alex Kielar | March 31st, 2020 

Another episode in our “This Day In Baseball History” series as I had Nick Jehamy on again to talk about this day in history. In this episode, you will find out about the expansion teams that made their debuts, trades that happened, the 1994 strike finally coming to an end and a lot more!

Continue reading

San Francisco Giants 2020 Season Preview

Sam Schneider | March 30th, 2020 

The San Francisco Giants finished 2019 with their third straight losing season. Although their win total increased each of the last two seasons, there’s not a lot of good to look forward to in 2020 as the rebuilding continues, but there are pieces in the organization that lend themselves some hope for the future. Continue reading

What If…The 1994 MLB Strike Never Happened (NL Edition)

John Lepore | March 29th, 2020

The Strike of 1994 devastated baseball. It was the first time since 1904 that the World Series wasn’t played. It cut short historic seasons, deprived franchises of turning their fortunes around, and cost the game some fans who had grown up on the crack of the bat and the smell of peanuts. But on August 11, 1994, after Randy Johnson struck out Ernie Young, there was no joy in Mudville or any other town where baseball was played.

Continue reading

New York Yankees 2020 Season Preview

Alex Kielar| March 29th, 2020

The Yankees fell just short of getting back to the World Series in 2019, falling to the Houston Astros in six games in the American League Championship Series. During the regular season, they put up their second straight 100-win season, going 103-59 and rolling to their first American League East Championship since 2012. They ran right through the Minnesota Twins in the American League Division Series, sweeping them in three games, 10-4, 8-2, and 5-1. Continue reading

Houston Astros 2020 Season Preview

Euan Leith | March 28th, 2020

The Houston Astros won 100 games for the third season in a row last year and made it all the way to a Game 7 versus the Washington Nationals last season, but couldn’t clinch their second World Series title in three years.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – March 28: Player Traded For Stadium Rental?

Alex Kielar | March 28th, 2020

As we continue the “This Day In Baseball History” series, myself and Nick Jehamy again looked back in time. Baseball has the advantage of having a very historic past, so we have a lot to look back on as we do this series.

Continue reading

Pittsburgh Pirates 2020 Season Preview

Kody Clawson  | March 28th, 2020

The Pirates’ 2019 campaign was a rough one, to be sure, going 69-93, finishing last in the division, and ending with the firing of manager Clint Hurdle, general manager Neal Huntington, and beginning a possible rebuild that has, unfortunately, seemingly been a long time coming. Hiring former Red Sox GM Ben Cherington and pairing him with manager Derek Shelton, the team looks to retool its major league roster while also restock the farm system to prepare for the next chance to retake the division and become competitive once more.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: This Day In Baseball History – March 27

Alex Kielar | March 27th, 2020 

We continue our series looking back in time on each day in baseball history. Without new baseball, we will look back in history until the season finally does start. I had Nick Jehamy on again for this episode, as we talked about when the Los Angeles Dodgers were sold to Magic Johnson and all the way back when and how the Chicago Cubs got their name.

Continue reading

Too Much Pod Tar Podcast: Quarantine Life

Alex Kielar | March 25th, 2020 

Life is so much different and sadder with no sports around (besides virtual ones). In this one, the regular co-hosts as we’re gonna call it, Alex Kielar and Johnnie Black, are joined by “Buck-Guys Talk Podcast” host Daniel Corrigan. They try to brighten things up a bit by finding several interesting topics to talk about.

Continue reading

What If…The 1994 MLB Strike Never Happened (AL Edition)

John Lepore | March 24th, 2020

The Strike of 1994 devastated baseball. It was the first time since 1904 that the World Series wasn’t played. It cut short historic seasons, deprived franchises of turning their fortunes around, and cost the game some fans who had grown up on the crack of the bat and the smell of peanuts. But on August 11, 1994, after Randy Johnson struck out Ernie Young, there was no joy in Mudville or any other town where baseball was played.

Continue reading

Utilitarianism, When Two Sports Clash, and the Dude Who Played an NBA Game and Never Got Paid for It

“The pupil who is never required to do what he cannot do, never does what he can do.”

One thing that’s always intrigued me about sports is the dying phenomenon of the multi-sport athlete at the professional level.

While sports, in general, are beginning to largely ditch specialists in favor of utilitarians, the greatest form of a utilitarian (no, I’m obviously not talking about John Stuart Mill) is no longer a thing. Continue reading

Milwaukee Brewers 2020 Season Preview

John Lepore | March 23rd, 2020

The Milwaukee Brewers finished 89-73 last season. That was good enough for a Wild Card berth. They lost to the eventual World Series champs in the one-game playoff. They will look to get back to the playoffs this season but will have to do it without a few key players. Let’s take a look at what 2020 holds in store for the Brew Crew.

Continue reading