Dodgers Top Ten Second Baseman of All-Time

Levon Satamian| June 21st, 2019

The Los Angeles Dodgers have had many great talents over the years. I am going to take a look back at the top ten Dodgers of All-Time in each position, starting with the second basemen.

Honorable mention: Chase Utley.

Chase Utley has had a legendary career, and some people may be wondering why he is an honorable mention. Utley had his best seasons with the Philadelphia Phillies. With Los Angeles, Utley played in 386 games over a four-year span. He had 1,109 at-bats, 262 hits, 154 runs, 26 home runs, 109 runs batted in, 12 stolen bases, and a batting average of  .236. Utley came to LA when he was 36-years old, in 2015. Utley’s best season as a Dodger was in 2016; he played in 138 games, he had 512 at-bats, 129 hits, 79 runs, 14 home runs, 52 runs batted in, and .252 batting average. He was a fan favorite in Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Utley was respected around the league by the fans, players, managers, and owners.

Tenth: Rafael Furcal.

Rafael Furcal spent six years in Los Angeles, playing for the Dodgers. He started his journey with the Dodgers in 2006. Furcal finished his tenure in Los Angeles, with 2,511 at-bats, 711 hits, 407 runs, 44 home runs, 228 runs batted in, 109 stolen bases, with a batting average of .283, in 617 games. Furcal had some memorable moments as a Dodger, like the walk-off double against the Nationals. In 2010, Furcal was named an All-Star. During that season, Furcal played in 97 games; he had 383 at-bats, 77 hits, 44 runs, 8 home runs, 43 runs batted in, 22 stolen bases, and a .300 batting average. Furcal was one of those players who did not get much attention from the media, but when called upon, he delivered for the Dodgers.

Ninth: Dee Gordon.

Dee Gordon was drafted by the Dodgers, and he made his debut with the team in 2011. Gordon had an impressive rookie season, appearing in just 56 games, but having 224 at-bats, 68 hits, 34 runs, 11 runs batted in, 24 stolen bases, and a .304 batting average. Gordon’s best season as a Dodger was in 2014. He had 609 at-bats, 176 hits, 92 runs, two home runs, 34 runs batted in, 64 stolen bases, and a .289 batting average. He was also named an All-Star in 2014. Gordon was not known for hitting home runs, as he hit just four home runs, in four years with Los Angeles, but he was extremely fast and had 130 stolen bases in four years.

Eighth: Don Zimmer.

Don Zimmer started playing for the Dodgers when they were in Brooklyn. Zimmer played with the Dodgers for seven years. Four years in Brooklyn, and three years in Los Angeles. Zimmer’s best season as a Dodger was in 1958. He played in 127 games; he had 455 at-bats, 119 hits, 52 runs, 17 home runs, 60 runs batted in, 14 stolen bases, and a .262 batting average. After spending six years with the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, Zimmer played for the Chicago Cubs, New York Mets, and Cincinnati Reds, before re-joining the Dodgers in 1963, for one more season in Los Angeles. Zimmer finished his career with the Dodgers, posting 303 hits, in 1,329 at-bats, 145 runs, 43 home runs, 161 runs batted in, 25 stolen bases, and a .228 batting average, in 459 games.

Seventh: Jim Lefebvre.

Jim Lefebvre spent his whole career in Los Angeles. He played with the Dodgers for eight years, from 1965, until 1972. In his first year with the Dodgers, Lefebvre won Rookie of the Year. In his second season with the Dodgers, Lefebvre was named an All-Star. Lefebvre’s best season as a Dodger was in 1966. He had 544 at-bats, 149 hits, 69 runs, 24 home runs, 74 runs batted in, and a .274 batting average. Over his eight-year career, Lefebvre played in 922 games; he had 3,014 at-bats, 756 hits, 313 runs, 74 home runs, 404 runs batted in, and a .251 batting average. Lefebvre also won a World Series with the Dodgers in 1965, the same year he won the Rookie of the Year Award.

Sixth: Charlie Neal.

Charlie Neal spent six years with the Dodgers. He started his career off with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956. He played with the Dodgers from 1956 until 1961. Neal’s best season as a Dodger was in 1959. He had 616 at-bats, 177 hits, 103 runs, 19 home runs, 83 runs batted in, and a .287 batting average. Over his six years as a Dodger, Neal played in 728 games, he had 2,491 at-bats, 659 hits, 374 runs, 73 home runs, 312 runs batted in, and a .265 batting average. He also was named an All-Star in 1960. Neal ended his Dodger career as a two-time All-Star and a World Series Champion in 1959.

Fifth: Jeff Kent.

Jeff Kent was 37 years old when he joined the Dodgers. He was well past his prime, but he was still great for the boys in blue. Kent was named an All-Star and Silver Slugger in his first season with Los Angeles. Kent’s best season as a Dodgers was in 2005, where he had 553 at-bats, 160 hits, 100 runs, 29 home runs, 105 runs batted in, and a .289 batting average. In his four years with the Dodgers, Kent played in 521 games, he had 1,894 at-bats, 551 hits, 281 runs, 75 home runs, 311 runs batted in, and a .291 batting average.

Fourth: Jim Gilliam.

Jim Gilliam spent fourteen years with the Dodgers, from 1953 until 1966. He spent five years in Brooklyn, and nine years in Los Angeles. Gilliam won four World Series Championships with the Dodgers. In 1953, Gilliam won Rookie of the Year. He was named an All-Star in 1956, and 1959. Gilliam’s best season as a Dodger was in 1953. He had 605 at-bats, 168 hits, 125 runs, six home runs, 63 runs batted in, 21 stolen bases, and a .278 batting average. In his fourteen years with the Dodgers, Gilliam played in 1,956 games, he had 7,119 at-bats, 1,889 hits, 1,163 runs, 65 home runs, 558 runs batted in, 203 stolen bases, and a .265 batting average.

Third: Steve Sax.

Steve Sax spent the first eight years of his career, from 1981 until 1988 in Los Angeles, with the Dodgers. Sax was named an All-Star three out of the eight years he was with the Dodgers. He was also Rookie of the Year in 1982, along with being a Silver Slugger in 1986. Sax’s best season with the Dodgers was in 1986. He had 633 at-bats, 210 hits, 91 runs, 6 home runs, 56 runs batted in, 40 stolen bases, and a whopping .332 batting average. In his eight-year career with the Dodgers, Sax played in 1,091 games; he had 4,312 at-bats, 1,218 hits, 574 runs, 30 home runs, 333 runs batted in, 290 stolen bases, and a .282 batting average. Sax won two World Series Championships with Los Angeles, in 1981 and 1988. His first and last season with the Dodgers.

Second: Davey Lopes.

Davey Lopes spent ten years with the Dodgers, from 1972 until 1981. Lopes was a four-time All-Star and also won the Gold Glove Award, in 1978. Lopes’ best season as a Dodger was in 1979. He had 582 at-bats, 154 hits, 109 runs, 28 home runs, 73 runs batted in, 44 stolen bases, and a .265 batting average. Throughout his ten year career as a Dodger, Lopes played in 1,207 games; he had 4,590 at-bats, 1,204 hits, 759 runs, 99 home runs, 384 runs batted in, 418 stolen bases, and a .262 batting average. In 1981, not only was Lopes named an All-Star, but he also was a World Series Champion.

First: Jackie Robinson.

Jackie Robinson played in the Major League for ten years, all with the Brooklyn Dodgers. In 1947, Jackie Robinson was the first African-American player in Major League Baseball. He broke the color barrier in a sport that had been segregated for more than fifty years. Robinson won Rookie of the Year in 1947. He had 590 at-bats, 175 hits, 125 runs, 12 home runs, 48 runs batted in, 29 stolen bases, a .297 batting average. Robinson’s best season as a Dodger was in 1949. He had 593 at-bats, 203 hits, 122 runs, 16 home runs, 124 runs batted in, 37 stolen bases, and a whopping .342 batting average. Throughout his career, Robinson played in 1,382 games; he had 4,877 at-bats, 1,518 hits, 947 runs, 137 home runs, 734 runs batted in, 197 stolen bases, and whopping .342 batting average. He was named an All-Star in 1949, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, and 1954, he was named Most Valuable Player in 1949, and he won the World Series Championship with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1955. He also entered the Hall of Fame. Jackie Robinson was more than an athlete. He was a civil rights activist. Not only did Jackie Robinson break the color barrier, changing baseball forever, but he also changed the culture and society of America itself, and he fought racism at all costs.

The Dodgers, ever since there establishment, have had numerous second baseman of high reputation. They have had many reputable second basemen, but in the opinion of many sportswriters, the names mentioned above, stand out as the best.

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Main Image Credit:  Embed from Getty Images

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